Typography

Brand fonts

Our brand fonts should be used in all brand communications where technically possible.

Our header font is Alternate Gothic No. 3 D. It is a bold, condensed sans serif.

Alternate Gothic
No3 D

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
1234567890!@#$%ˆ&*()

Header

This is a header.

Our subhead and body fonts are Neue Haas Grotesk. It is a minimal, clean sans serif.

Neue Haas
Grotesk

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
1234567890!@#$%ˆ&*()

Subhead

This is an H2 subhead.

Subhead

This is an H3 subhead.

Subhead

This is an inline subhead.

Body

This is an inline subhead.

System fonts​

In situations where our brand fonts aren’t available due to technical limitations, we can use system typefaces. Thanks to their near-universal availability, these typefaces are ideal substitutes for our brand fonts in applications like Word and PowerPoint. They should be used only when our brand fonts aren’t available, and never in advertising, social media, or digital applications such as the website.

Our alternative header font is Franklin Gothic Condensed.
Note: Franklin Gothic Condensed is available as a default font on PCs. Mac users may download the font from our Typeface assets.

Franklin Gothic
Condensed Medium

Our alternative subhead and body fonts are Arial.

Arial

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
1234567890!@#$%ˆ&*()

Legacy fonts

Our previous font was Raleway Sans. Take care to update existing assets to our new brand fonts, so that our brand can appear immediately and understandably consistent. Below is a comparison between Raleway and Neue Haas Grotesk, so you can be sure you’re using the right font.

These characteristics will help you instantly recognize that you are using the right font:

  • Capital C terminals parallel to each other
  • Bowl of lowercase a curves up instead of down
  • Numbers are a consistent height

Raleway

ABCDEFage123456789!

Neue Haas
Grotesk

ABCDEFage123456789!

Typography specifications

Typographic hierarchy

It’s important to establish a clear typographic hierarchy to ensure our customers quickly focus on the key parts of our message. In all communications, our header should be read first, followed by our subheader, in-line header, and lastly, our body copy. Depending on the layout’s core message, some of these elements may not be necessary.

Our type is set left-aligned and Sentence case in all hierarchies.

Header

The header needs to communicate an outcome most prominently. This often means a number should be the most prominent typographic element within the design. A simple way to do this is to be sure that the header includes a number and that the type follows proper type hierarchy. If the header is long, outcomes can be distinguished using highlighting; see Typographic color combinations & highlighting section below.

Subhead

 

The subhead may be left aligned with the header or float a short ways to the right. If any hierarchy is indented in this way, all subsequent hierarchies should be indented the same amount. There should be no more than two levels of indentation in this way. See Indenting.

Inline header

The inline header may be left aligned with the preceding hierarchy or float a short ways to the right. If any hierarchy is indented in this way, all subsequent hierarchies should be indented the same amount. There should be no more than two levels of indentation in this way. See Indenting.

Body copy

The body copy must always be left-aligned with the inline header, if one is present. If no inline header is present, body copy may be left aligned with the preceding hierarchy or float a short ways to the right. If any hierarchy is indented in this way, all subsequent hierarchies should be indented the same amount. There should be no more than two levels of indentation in this way. See Indenting.

Call to action

Our call to action is an arrow in a circle followed by the CTA text. The arrow stroke thickness should be of an equal weight with the accompanying text; the circle stroke thickness should be 50% that. The height of the arrow should be equal and aligned to the capital height of the accompanying text. CTAs set in this way (not in a button; see below) should only be used on white backgrounds.

To draw the eye to the CTA on busy or dark backgrounds, it may be enclosed in a pill or rounded-corner rectangle holding shape to form a button. Buttons should follow drop shadow guidelines of holding shapes. Below are some CTA colorway options. We should try to match the colorway of the CTA to the font color, highlighting, and holding shape colors used in the rest of the composition.

Typographic color combinations & highlighting

Type should be set in approved combinations of type color and background for legibility and messaging purposes.

We can highlight specific words or phrases in headlines and subheads to draw more attention to them. We might do this to call attention to an outcome statement (like a number) within a long headline, or to our key message, “make it happen,” if the phrase is not already in its own standalone holding shape. We can do this in 2 ways: highlighting words with font size, or with color.

Font size highlighting

Use font size highlighting in header fonts only. This should only be used to highlight a number in a long header statement when using a background color that doesn’t allow for color highlighting. Background colors that can’t use color highlighting are Mid-Blue, Bright Blue, Light Blue, and Orange. Numbers highlighted with font sizing should be approximately 200% larger than the supporting header font.

Color highlighting

Use color highlighting in header or subhead fonts only. If highlighting a word or phrase in a header, do not also highlight a word or phrase in an immediately subsequent subhead. Stick to approved color combinations when highlighting words to avoid legibility issues or diluting our message.

Indenting

Indenting some blocks of copy introduces a tension to our designs, underscoring our energetic tone. Indenting should be used tactfully and not over-applied: once in a composition is sufficient.

Headers should never be indented. Indenting is done relative to the header copy. Once a text block of a certain hierarchy has been indented, all subsequent copy should be left-aligned to the indented block of text. Body copy must always be left-aligned with the inline header, if one is present. There should be no more than two levels of indentation.

Text to be indented should be placed approximately 3 M-widths (the width of a capital letter M) of the subhead font to the right.

Do’s and don’ts

Helpful links

Download eBook

Download eBook

Your content is downloading. Give it a moment.

While you wait…

Sign up for more content goodies below.

Get latest know-how from CX and digital transformation leaders. In your inbox once a month.

Eddie Monteiro

Eddie is currently Chief Operating Officer at Educational Testing Service (ETS), where he sets and drives the transformation agenda across the company and has responsibility for all technology and operations functions in addition to the College Board, K-12, and teacher licensure businesses. He previously ran business and technology services at Pearson, where he built a global team to enable scalable delivery of enterprise functions. Prior to that, while at IBM, he held several executive leadership roles in the US, Mexico and Brazil across a diverse set of industries and clients.
Geetha Krishnan

Geetha Krishnan

Geetha Krishnan consults with the Indian Institute for Human Settlements in Bangalore as Senior Advisor and Head of Digital Blended Learning, where he spearheads their online learning and continuing education portfolio. Over 25 years, Geetha has played senior roles in diverse sectors such as academia, online learning, and advertising. In his last role as Director – Centre for Executive Education at the Indian School of Business (ISB), Geetha was head of the profit center comprising more than 50 open enrollment and long duration programs and spearheaded ISB’s foray into online learning by enabling their partnership with Coursera.
Susan Aldridge

Susan Aldridge

Dr. Aldridge is an Executive Higher Education Consultant to university presidents and ministers of education regarding business models and technology-enhanced education. She recently retired from Drexel University after serving six years as president of Drexel University Online overseeing more than 125 online programs. During her six-year tenure as President of University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC), she doubled the university’s enrollment to 97,000 – to become the largest public American university. She also served as Vice Chancellor for Troy University’s Global Campus managing online programs and satellite campuses in 12 countries and 17 states.

Alan Greenberg

Alan Greenberg

Previously Director Apple Education EMEA and APAC, Alan led the team that built Education Podcasting and iTunes U. He has worked on the development of Apple Education mobile strategy, iOS Education APPs, and developed the SEED CSR project in China, a collaboration between Apple, Foxconn, and Pearson. Executive Board of WideCells Group Plc, Group CBDO, and EVP & Founder of Wideacademy; his working contributions include multiple technology engagements providing domain expertise across digital, mobile, brand, scale-up, international business development, and venture capital.

This form will put you in touch with our business development team. For all other functions, please click here.

Ready to get in touch and grow your business?
Tell us a little more so we can connect you with the right person
Last step! Let us know which solutions you're most interested in
Connect with us

Download Now

Simply fill out this form to download